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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
do the reverse? >> what i say is that generally in the environment we're in thou, we're seeing a pick up in u.s. growth, pick up in chinese growth. we're starting to see a pick up in demand for key industrial commodities. i think at this point you're starting to see investors shift away from the cyclical commodities such as gold. >> it's shifting away from the nor defensive types of assets and even more in the commodities space moving more to the industrials. >> paladium, platinum up at seven-month highs. what is behind that? >> we're starting to see a pick up in growth in china and the u.s. the world's two largest economies. also you're seeing issues on the copper. there are a lot of problems in terms of getting these medals out of the ground. for platinum, 80% of it is produced in south africa. when you have labor issues, it has a big impact on supply. on the palladium side, we have the russian state slowing down substantially. it's stockpiled sales. you're seeing a squeeze -- >> supply side issues, as well. >> absolutely. and you're seeing a pick up in demand. that's been driving p
of opportunity. >> what about the idea that the regulatory environment is getting tougher from the epa to, you know, the financial regulators, dodd frank, business today faces a different regulatory environment than the past couple of decades, no? >> i don't think so. i remember early on acquisitions we were going to make t at at&t, it was tough. we didn't know. we spent a great deal of time in the political part of the business and the regulatory part of the business. it was touch and go. i'm not sure it's changed so much. >> i see. okay. what about the global story? a lot of people say in the last several decades american business was really riding a wave of globalization. today, you're more likely to hear about jobs in buffalo and in michigan than in bangalor, india. are economies looking inward? >> i think so. i think there are some coming back. i think that's a good observation and i think that's a good sign. >> you think it's a good sign that it's not the globalization sort of openness that we saw a few years ago and now economies are looking inward? >> glad to see us bringing jobs back
his state of the union address. protecting the environment has long been hollywood issue as you know. no, i wasn't there but the organization that i'm involved with, rain forest action network, their people were there. and -- >> so when you heard the president speak last night about climate change and that we must do something about climate change, was that enough for you? >> no, no. i mean, look, i'm a huge supporter of obama's. it's the first president i ever donated money to. but i think in terms of climate change and the environment, he's been at best disappointing. i thought it was decent rhetoric and i don't know if there's any teeth to this but, you know, look, it's complicated. he can't -- i think politicians feel like it's political suicide to be talking about the environment. the time has come when we're in a planetary emergency here. i think he could be using the bully pulpit more here. >> last night he said for the sake of our children and future we must do more to combat climate chang. we can choose to believe that superstorm sandy and the worst drought in decade -- >> w
of people urged president obama to make protecting the environment a higher priority during his second term. a group gathered the san francisco to rally against the keystone xl pipeline. that proposal calls for moving oil from canada to the gulf of mexico through several states. ♪ >> ama: a larger demonstration took place in washington, dc. that group voiced its opposition to the keystone pipeline as well. demonstrators also called for the president and congress to take more action on climate change. >> still to come, kicking off spring training. abc7 sports anchor mike shumann is in arizona. >> mike: we'll talk with managing partner of the a's bat proposed new stadium, and the story of the day, josh reddick's beard. >> ama: the cost of fighting wildfires, and the new criticism about who has to pay for it. >> as is he reign of silicon valley coming to an end? >> leigh: i'm meteorologist leigh glaser. boy, we have been full of springlike weather. it's going to start ending tomorrow with a return. we'll look at the accuweather >> ama: new at 6:00. california's effort to recover the cost of
with that. now is a great time for opportunity. >> what about the idea that the regulatory environment is getting tougher from the epa to the financial regulators, dodd-frank, basel. business faces a different situation than decades ago. >> i don't think so. i remember acquisitions with at&t we didn't know. it was tough. we spent a great deal of time in the political and regulatory part of the business. it was touch and go. i'm not sure it change sod much. >> okay. what about the global story? people say in the last several decades, you know, american business was really riding a wave of globalization. today you're more likely to hear about jobs in buffalo and in michigan than in bangalore, india. are economies looking inward? >> i think so. there are some coming back. that's a good sign. >> you think it's a good sign that it's not the globalization openness we saw a few years ago and now economies are looking inward? >> glad to see us bring jobs back to this country and rethink that. that's helpful. >> final question. what do you drive? you driving a gm? >> i am driving a gtm cadillac
of climate change and the environment, he's been at best disappointing. i thought it was decent rhetoric and i don't know if there's any teeth to this but, you know, look, it's complicated. he can't -- i think politicians feel like it's political suicide to be talking about the environment. the time has come when we're in a planetary emergency here. i think he could be using the bully pulpit more here. >> last night he said for the sake of our children and future we must do more to combat climate chang. we can choose to believe that superstorm sandy and the worst drought in decade -- >> well, that's great. but let's not drill in the arctic, which he was promoting. i think, you know, i think that he could be doing more for regulations with the environmental protection agency. some of the things that have come up they've ignored. i think he could be doing a lot more. it takes a lot of political courage. we're at a time when it comes to jobs and growth, people don't want to hear about it. we've got a cancer going on in this planet. we don't always see it but we're starting to see the finger
to learn how uas operate in different environments and how they impact air traffic operations. the test sites also inform the agency as we develop standards for certifying unmanned aircraft and determine the necessary air traffic requirements. in addition to the test sites, faa is publishing a notice in the federal register asking the public to review draft privacy language and provide input. the broad outline of faa's privacy proposal will require each test site to ensure their privacy policies address the following: notice or awareness, choice and consent, access and participation, integrity and security, and, finally, enforcement mechanisms to deal with violations of these policies. the faa thinks the test sites will provide important information that will inform our integration process moving forward. with respect to faa east research and development efforts, we are working in four areas, void, control and communication, maintenance and repair, and human factors. research in all four areas are critical as the opening statements mentioned. my written statement contains more details o
that are better places to the entrepreneurs and others. >> we need to provide an environment that says we want you to do good business and create jobs but also going to support u.s. people in your own personal agendas to help your community and nation and someone. connell: what are you doing? >> united nations foundation made a commitment to entrepreneurs to help them stepped into not only their business but their philanthropy and using their technology and innovation to help solve global problems. connell: where are you making the most progress? are there surprising results? people would say go to the united states go to silicon valley there are plenty of entrepreneurs but are there other places where it is surprisingly you are seeing strong growth in entrepreneurs? >> in the development space is interesting, not just charity anymore but i am going to create some innovations that might save lives. if you look at malaria deaths have been cut in half in 11 countries in the last five years that is the cause technology of the long-lasting, entrepreneur created. connell: not just people throwing money
tv, ben shapiro contends that liberals are guilty of bullying their opposition and creating an environment that discourages political debate. this heritage foundation event is a little under an hour. [applause] >> it's always a pleasure to be here: i'm a huge fan of heritage foundation, everything that they do, actually. they were the first outlet to pick up my syndicated column. i do have a fourth book before "bullies," i spoke here at heritage for that too. i'm also the editor at large of breitbart news, so if you're bored or have an ipad, you can tune in at 870.com. i want to start by talking about andrew breitbart. andrew was a mentor of mine. i met andrew when i was 17 years old. he had just seen a column i wrote for the ucla daily bruin, and he was sitting in a greasy taco joint, saw the column and then promptly e-mailed me. at the time, andrew was just the secret other half of the drudge report. we got together, we became fast friends. and one of the things that andrew and i used to talk about a lot because we knew each other for over a decade before his untimely death, he used to t
is different than the environment started 100 years ago but the editorial focus is to challenge our readers assumptions. from one perspective why wouldn't all media do that? and i think particularly in 2013 in the environment where it does not. on the women of the spectrum when i call the newspapers used to be the dominant news delivery method. it's now "the new york times" also the huffingtonpost.com, the daily beast. it gives you information about what happened jester date. it tends to be hit line driven cut it tends to be what you read at 9 a.m.. it's part of my media every day and part of everyone's media digest. on the other end of the spectrum it is a starkly -- historic the their fan magazines and it's been largely about storytelling wedding of things like "the new york times" magazine or the new yorker or other relief venerable new yorker books, other really venerable publications which take time to read and context and it pretty educated audience. for us we are trying to position ourselves in the space in between the two. the goal at the new republic is to do great writing, the typ
. it may allow people to detect light and dark in the environment. the blind can see something again. >> one of the things i can do now is laundry. my husband had to put the colored clothes all together in a pile. with the glasses, i'm able to do that myself. >> reporter: kathy blake is 61 and has been blind for 23 years. but after a two-hour surgery, kathy has a new perspective. >> the glasses really help me be more outdoors, with mobility, walking. >> reporter: right now, the device is only approved for retinitis p retinitis pigmentosa. complete vision loss. only about 100,000 people in the u.s. suffer from it. the device could be used to treat millions who can't see. >> i think that the future for this is going to be big. >> reporter: let's hope. and if you're wondering what sparked the doctor's interest in blindness? it turns out, his grandmother went blind. so, he devoted his entire career to finding a cure for this. >> how rewarding for him. >> thanks, gio. >>> coming up on the broadcast, the big question for "star wars" geeks. is harrison ford going to go solo one more time? k
thought livestock are not the world takes a toll on the environment, etc.. yet you meet in the stores and we talk about this some people would say okay well here is john mackey talking about how we have to do the right thing and this is a greater mission and purpose and on the other side he's chasing profits. how do you put those together? >> guest: perfection is not one of the options we have and i don't think it is a trade-off. oftentimes if you look for the trade-offs you will find trade-offs. that is the we the the amount of local mind works. it goes in and tries to take things apart and find the trade-off. i say when you find the trade-off in the business it is a failure of imagination and creativity that couldn't find or hasn't yet found that strategy. in in the example that you use, the reality of the fact is that we are in business to serve our customers and our customers vote when they come into our stores and if we are not prepared to sell them the food they want to buy it isn't so much that we are chasing profits as we are trying to create value for the customers and they d
in the environment. the obama administration put off deciding whether to okay the project until after the presidential election. the state department says a final decision on the pipeline could come this spring. one scientist at the kato institute predicts the president will green light the pipeline. >> i think the white house has probably made its decision on keystone. the political calculus is obvious. if they come out against, it they are going to pay a very big price. >> president obama talked about climate change in his state of the union address last week, but he did not specifically mention the keystone xl pipeline. christi. >> all right. emily, thank you so much. >>> robert kennedy jr. was among those protesting the keystone pipeline. he was even arrested during a demonstration outside the white house this past week. we'll get his perspective on the message that he's trying to send to the president. that's coming up in a couple of minutes. >>> want to get you to vatican city and pope benedict's farewell tour. he spoke in several languages in st. peter's square and he got to sp
will, the worst of the items tested first. we just heard from the secretary of the environment saying he hopes all the testing will be done by the end of the week. the results will be done by the end of next week. it may drag into next week, michael. >> so, nic, are people still buying what they think is beef? is it dangerous if it's horse meat? >> you know, i think that the danger issue has been somewhat laid to rest. the danger was it was horse meat contaminated with a drug that prevents or sort of cures animals of pain. but in humans, it's very, very dangerous. the levels you would have to eat we were told by the government scientists would be so high, impractical, unlikely. but consumer confidence has been marked. two-thirds of people here say there's no longer sure about what's on the box as they were before. and a quarter of people say that they're going to cut down buying processed meat. and another one-fifth of people said they'd like to cut down on buying processed meat, they just can't afford to do it. so there's concern. the consumers are changing their habit based on this.
, which is we live in a global competitive environment and this kind of stealing can leapfrog them ahead of us in business, in development, without having to spend the money or the capital for the research and development to get there. >> are they better at hacking than we are? >> no but they're not playing fair, and that's the key here. >> as with john miller i write down what he says. this is the cold war for the >>> and speaking of threats, there's a new threat to your credit rating. it's not identity threat but mistakes that somebody else is making that's affecting you. we'll show you why "60 minutes" covered it and tomorrow we'll speak with i remember the day my doctor said i had diabetes. there's a lot i had to do... watch my diet. stay active. start insulin... today, i learned there's something i don't have to do anymore. my doctor said that with novolog® flexpen® i don't have to use a syringe and a vial or carry a cooler. flexpen® comes prefilled with fast-acting insulin used to help control high blood sugar when you eat. dial the exact dose. inject by push
. whatever environment they're in we've got to take on a role. that's purposeful but the surprise is that these young people are just like every other young person everywhere else. >> you say like every other young person. are they seek guidance as well? ? >> it is the perception. sa lot a lot of what's saving them is i find them to be extremely engaging inquisitive. they have the same hopes and as pier ragss as everyone else. they don't have the same beginnings. they don't have the same opportunities. there are a lot of obstacles that many of these young people none of us have never had to face. >> i always believe if kids don't think you care they don't care what you think. and at your school it says four principals in the last six years. are you staying? >> i'm staying. listen. some of these kids the lives of these young people will be with me for the rest of my life. they have impacted me in ways i never expected. i think if you talked to my teachers they'd say the same. what i know is they need stability and continuity and right now we're seeing positive cha
down, more regulation, more taxes, more of an not ti business kind of environment. the unemployment rate in texas is 7%. we're over 10%. surely they must realize that the policies here are incredibly negative. they're just anti-growth." how do you answer something like that? >> we're using that resmed case study in san diego to focus on just exactly what we might do, say, as a city or as a state to keep a company like that here. we hear a lot of generalities. i want to know the specifics. we're going to use that as a case study, and we take it seriously. we're not going to sacrifice in california or san diego a high quality of life based on educational investment, innovative economy, lifestyle, for, again, a short-term corporate profits. there are some companies, especially if they're low wage companies or established technologies that might profit from that and make that move, but when you're talking about our future and what we in san diego especially are doing is trying to recover from our economy with innovative based technologies and companies, that kind of allure is just not -
exceptionally clear, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call 1-800-414-5999 or visit trylyric.com for a risk-free 30 day trial offer and free dvd and brochure. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. >>> sounds strange, but the horse meat scandal continues to spread across europe. six major french retailers have pulled lasagna off their shelves, this one month after horse meat was found in burgers supposed to be made of above. cat, explain this to us. this is showing up in sweden, uk, france, wasn't supposed to be there. how did this happen. >> reporter: that's the problem. nobody knows. this points to a huge breakdown in the foot chain. horse meat is eating in a lot of countries, france, italy, kazakhstan, their horses are raised for food, the problem is a lot of these were not actually sanctioned for human consumption, and nobody knows how it slipped into the system. >> what does that mean for people who ate this mea
. this is the cold war for the next generation, which is we live in a global competitive environment and this kind of stealing can leapfrog them ahead of us in business, in development, without having to spend the money or the capital for the research and development to get there. >> are they better at hacking than we are? >> no but they're not playing fair, and that's the key here. >> as with john miller i write down what he says. this is the cold war for the next generation. john mel >>> good morning. we have fog on tv hill. the rain has come to an end as it has for most of the western shore. we're cruising in on 40 degrees right now. we're going to go for a high temperature of right around 60. we'll take that line of rain out before not too long. you can see the eastern shore is still getting a little moisture. 60 this >>> and speaking of threats, there's a new threat to your credit rating. it's not identity threat but mistakes that somebody else is making that's affecting you. we'll show you why "60 minutes" covered it and tomorrow we'll speak with former vice president dick ch
the challenges as -- >> yes. >> -- kids growing up in that environment? >> yes. that is the point. they are really going to mature quickly. but also they're going to learn that this new brother i have, maybe he's not so bad after all. maybe he actually brings something into my life, in the way that kids do. first usually by saying i don't know if i like you so much or not. the big part of the story is adventure. it is full-on survivor adventure. >> this is the age group of 8 to 10. >> 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, yeah. the characters are 8 to 13. so right in that range. >> and we know that it continues. you said it's the first of three. they're still stranded? >> oh, yes. they're still stranded at the end of book one. >> okay. survival skills will come in handy. congrats on the show. >> thanks. >> keep it going. >> thanks for having me on. >> jeff probst, thank you so much. >>> coming up next, last-minute valentine's gifts right after this. this is bob, a regular guy with an irregular heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a h
of environment we want to establish. maybe if the school isn't singularly dedicated to bringing these students together, it's about integrating the classroom. >> if your kid is, say, gifted or talented and slowed down some way in this classroom? >> i think it's mitigated by the fact that they have tailored experience. you're getting special attention in the classroom no matter what. >> alex, thanks for the story. >>> they say you can't be a little bit pregnant. one man who tried to be, after your local news. you're getting special attention >>> 8:30 now on this monday morning. it's the 18th of february, 2013. chilly day out here on our plaza. we have a lot of hardy folks who decided to come by, say hello. lots have stopped by, not the least of which, steve harvey, our co-host. >> i'm here. >> how do you like it so far? oh, come on. still thawing out? >> i love work iing outside. who thought of this? >> i know. this is our last moment outside. >> okay. >> coming up, you're going to go inside and speak to the pregnant man? >> this guy wore the suit because he wanted to see what his wife was expe
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

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